Testing


 

You should get a test if you develop symptoms of coronavirus. The main symptoms are:

  • a new continuous cough
  • a high temperature,
  • a loss of, or change in, your normal sense of taste or smell (anosmia)
  • You can also get a test if:
  • you live in England and have been told to have a test before you go into hospital, for example, for surgery
  • your local council asks you to get a test
  • you’re taking part in a government pilot project

The test is only reliable if you have coronavirus symptoms so it is important to only get a test if you develop symptoms or if have been asked to get a test. This will help make sure that those people who need a test can get one.

Do not use this service to get a test if you’re travelling abroad. You can pay for a private test.

More information is available on GOV.UK.

Local test sites

There are two new local test sites in Plymouth at Marjon and the Guildhall which do not rely on vehicle access. The new sites have added a further 760 more tests each day to local testing capacity, in addition to the existing drive in test site at the former Seaton Barracks site off William Prance Road.

All the testing sites in Plymouth are operating seven days a week 8am to 8pm, if you are experiencing COVID-19 symptoms then book a test by calling 119 or by visiting the NHS website. 

Testing is available by appointment at a drive-through or walk-through test site, or via a home test kit. Details of the test, what to expect and where to go will be provided at the time of booking.

You can book a test by calling 119 or by visiting the NHS website. A test is free and you will either be able to book an appointment at a drive-through or walk-through test site or ask for a home test kit. Details of the test, what to expect and where to go will be given at the time of booking.

If you develop symptoms of coronavirus you should get a test as soon as possible. The test needs to be carried out within five days of the symptoms appearing.

During days one to four you can get tested either at a test site or by ordering a home test kit. A home test kit must be ordered by 3pm on day four.  On day five you will need to go to a test site.

More information is available on GOV.UK.

If you suspect that your or someone in your household has any symptoms of coronavirus, you must stay at home, self-isolate and the symptomatic person should be tested.

If the test is positive, then the person should self-isolate in line with the national guidelines. If this is someone staying with you, this may be at your home, or it may need to be back at his or her own home, close to his or her own medical support.

More information is available on the NHS website.

Call 119 for details on how to book and where to go for a test. Please do not ignore your symptoms.

If you have any symptoms of coronavirus you must follow Government guidance and self isolate, get tested and follow further advice. Please do not ignore your symptoms.

Testing can be accessed by going to the NHS website or by calling 119. 

You will be able to either book an appointment at a drive-through or walk through test site or ask for a home test kit. More information is available on the NHS website.

If you feel unwell please call 111, or your regular GP.

A test for coronavirus is free. If you have any symptoms of coronavirus you must follow government guidance and stay at home, get tested and follow further advice.

People can access a test by going to the NHS website or by calling 119. You will either be able to book an appointment at a drive-through or walk through test site or ask for a home test kit. More information is available on the NHS website.

There are various test sites across Plymouth. If you have booked a drive-through or walk-through test, the location of the test site will be given to you at the time of booking. Alternatively, you can order a home testing kit.

If you cannot get a test, you must self-isolate for 14 days because it will have been more than five days since your symptoms started. It is important to stay at home, even if you feel better.

More information is available on GOV.UK.

The test is only reliable if you have coronavirus symptoms so you should not arrange for a test unless you develop symptoms. The main symptoms are:

  • a new continuous cough
  • a high temperature,
  • a loss of, or change in, your normal sense of taste or smell (anosmia)

The service is currently very busy. If you cannot book a test now or at the desired location or time, try again in a few hours. Only get a test if you have coronavirus symptoms or have been asked to get a test. This will help make sure people who need a test can get one.

NHS Test and Trace helps anyone with symptoms of coronavirus to get tested quickly and then traces those who have been in recent close contact with someone who has tested positive. These people are also asked to self-isolate; if any of those people become infectious, then they will not pass it on to others. This stops the infection from spreading.

Test and Trace data will also feed into the Local Outbreak Management Plan by identifying any potential outbreaks within an area. Getting this data quickly will allow early intervention measures to be put in place in order to protect communities and, again, prevent further the spread of the virus.

More information on Test and Trace can be found on the NHS website, and government guidance on the service is available on the GOV.UK website. 

No test is 100% reliable. That is why there are criteria around who should have the test, and when they should have it. When the test is carried out on people who have symptoms, it is thought to be very reliable with over 97.5% being ‘true positives’ (i.e. the person does have COVID-19 when the test tells them they do).

The false negative (i.e. the person does actually have COVID-19 but the test tells them that they do not) rate may be higher and can be due to the swabbing technique or if people are tested either too early (straight after being infected, before they have symptoms) or too late after symptoms have started.

No it is not true.

There are two main types of test that are being used for COVID-19, one looks for the virus itself (PCR) and the other looks for the changes in your immune system triggered by the virus. It is PCR testing that is most commonly used for COVID-19, and it is this type of test, using a throat or nasal swab, that you would receive through the government’s home testing kits, or drive through testing site at Seaton Barracks.

PCR testing is a well-established as a diagnostic tool and is used for many different viruses and bacteria; though the general technique is the same, each test is individual to the exact virus it is looking for, and specific “primers” and “probes” are used which attach themselves to specific sequences of the virus’s genetic code, and send out a signal that indicates the genetic material has been found. These primers are designed to target unique segments of the virus’s genome. 

If a PCR test for COVID-19 is positive, then it is not responding to a common cold, or flu, or indeed any other coronavirus other than COVID-19.